Tag: New York City

On the last day of January Lemoin Thompson III, better known as Buddy Esquire, died in a tragic fire at his home in the Bronx. Esquire, often referred to as the “king of the hip-hop flyer,” was an innovator in designing handbills for the block parties that were responsible for the growth of hip-hop in its earliest days.

It turns out not all stories of shuttered mom and pop businesses need to end in heartbreak, which surprises me as much as I’m sure it surprises you. Case in point: Jerry Delakas’ newsstand in Astor Place. Last month New York’s Department of Consumer Affairs shut Delakas down for not having an operator license for his shop. Delakas didn’t have…

There’s a fascinating story by Corey Kilgannon in today’s issue of The New York Times. It follows the exploits of the Ryders Alley Trencher-fed Society, or R.A.T.S., a group of dog owners who take their pets to downtown Manhattan to hunt and kill rats: “The dogs raced toward a pile of trash bags in the middle of the alley,…

On some days, the Internet still surprises me. This morning, for example, while looking for the proper way to spell boombox (i.e., research for this story; one word or two?) I stumbled across an article written by Ben Sisario for the New York Times. It looked at the importance of the boombox in New York City’s urban culture of the…

In December of 1981, the week before Christmas, Meryl Meisler was offered a full-time job as an art teacher at I.S. 291 in Bushwick, Brooklyn. At the time, she was working part-time in East New York and the opportunity should have been ideal. But instead it gave Meisler pause. That’s because four years earlier, on July 13, 1977, while she…

I was not surprised when the “occupation” of Zucotti Park was cleared out last November by the NYPD. What surprised me was that it could persist for nearly two months in a place as spatially constricted as Manhattan. New York City is not particularly hospitable to those who wish to live off-the-grid or create autonomous spaces for themselves — artistic,…

A dispatch from the ‘uncanny valley’.

The first time I ever actually saw augmented reality, I was living in Albany, NY. My friend loaded LAYAR onto his phone and we walked around our neighborhood, watching real estate data instantiate alongside buildings.

The New York Times‘ Lens blog has put together a slide show commemorating the 10th anniversary edition of Jamel Shabazz’s book “Back in the Day” (powerHouse): “Photography gave Jamel Shabazz direction in life — straight to the young men and women he saw every day in parks, on stoops and on streets. When he started in the mid-1970s in Brooklyn’s…

You always hear about how New York’s Times Square was more fun back in the good old days, when hookers and porno ruled, before America’s terror mayor Rudy G. “took back the streets” by banishing the Squeegee Men and welcoming Disney into the fold. And maybe it was. But more aptly, it was a different era. According to some cursory…

Back in 1973, Norman Mailer and Jon Naar collaborated on The Faith of Graffiti. The book combined Mailer’s essay about the kids who were writing their names on the walls and subway cars in New York City at the time with Naar’s photographs. The Faith had been out of print for years, until HarperCollins reissued it this past…