Tag: photography

I experienced an odd moment of synchronicity this morning. After reading “Death Stares,” Tamara Kneese’s essay for The New Inquiry that examines selfies, narcissism, and death in the digital age, I then came across this passage from photographer Mike Mandel’s Myself: Timed Exposures, published in 1971:

In 1991 photographer Angela Kelly visited Rainbow House, a Chicago shelter for women and children who are victims of domestic violence. Like most shelters, the temporary residence affords women, many who are mothers, a moment to collect themselves and figure out how to start over — which is not exactly a simple task with easy answers. Kelly became aware of…

In Thomas M. Johnson’s Lakewood: Portraits of a Sacred American Suburb, he pays homage, in part, to William Levitt’s idyllic vision for planned living in postwar America. Introduced by a passage from D.J. Waldie, author of Holy Land: A Suburban Memoir, Johnson’s take on the suburban dream is quickly boiled down: “He’s picturing the place where stories of working-class aspirations…

Over at Texas Monthly, John Spong writes about about photographer Roberta Bayley’s experience covering the Sex Pistols’ ill-conceived 1978 tour of the United States. Never much a fan of Johnny Rotten and company, reading about the culture clash — which was purposely engineered by Malcolm McLaren (e.g., “His goal was conflict and the free press it would generate”) — is…

Late last month I came across a copy of The Sense of Wonder by Rachel Carson, the marine biologist and conservationist whose writing is often credited with advancing the modern environmental movement. What’s refreshing about this edition, however, is that Carson’s words appear alongside a collection of photographs, most notably the work of Charles Pratt, a photographer known for his…

Of the thousands of photographs that Charles “Teenie” Harris took in his lifetime — from candid portraits of Lena Horne, Duke Ellington, and George Benson to his documentation of the Civil Rights movement and his work for the Pittsburgh Courier — this image of children in Bedford Dwellings getting ready to go trick-or-treating is by far one of my favorites.…

When I started dating my wife back in the mid-1990s, we used to go with her grandma on Sunday nights to a bingo hall run by the Sons of Italy in Arnold, Pennsylvania. It was always fun, and often a spectacle. Men and women were seated at long banquet tables throughout the hall, a dozen bingo sheets laid out before…

In Tracking Time, photographer Camilo José Vergara‘s 40-year project that documents the evolution of poor and segregated communities in America, the imagery is most often focused on buildings. In a short film put together by the Getty Museum, Vergara explained his approach by saying he “realized that the buildings had the imprint not just of the people who live in…

Sometimes it’s hard to tell fantasy from reality, particularly in the age of Photoshop-manipulated imagery. In this photograph by Oscar Ruiz, however, which offers an aerial shot of a housing development on the outskirts of Mexico City, what you see is real.

In December of 1981, the week before Christmas, Meryl Meisler was offered a full-time job as an art teacher at I.S. 291 in Bushwick, Brooklyn. At the time, she was working part-time in East New York and the opportunity should have been ideal. But instead it gave Meisler pause. That’s because four years earlier, on July 13, 1977, while she…

In Rosalind Solomon’s Portraits in the Time of AIDS, 1988, the epidemic is laid bare in a series of intimate snapshots that depict the people who were not only battling the disease, but who were socially stigmatized by its diagnosis. Rosalind’s photographs, originally shown in 1988 at New York University’s Grey Gallery, were exhibited during the height of the AIDS

In 1985, British photographer Mark Power was commissioned by the Children’s Society, which was then the UK’s third largest charity organization for young people, to document what childhood was like in different parts of the country. In his summary of the Childrens Society Photographs, Power recalls the origins of the work and the economic climate of Thatcher’s England: “The brief…

In “Police Work,” Leonard Freed worked alongside the policemen of New York in order to see what life ‘on the beat’ was really like. What he documented here is an elegant yet grittily realistic portrait of ordinary people doing a “sometimes boring, sometimes corrupting, sometimes dangerous and ugly and unhealthy job.” Freed shows the isolation, the complexity, the harshness and…

On New Deal Utopias by Jason Reblando: “During the Great Depression, the U.S. government built three planned communities of Greenbelt, Maryland; Greenhills, Ohio; and Greendale, Wisconsin. In photographing these ‘Greenbelt’ towns, I explore the New Deal vision to resettle displaced farmers and poor urban dwellers in model cities which unified the best elements of ‘town’ and ‘country.’ I create an…

was born in tulsa oklahoma in 1943. when i was sixteen i started shooting amphetamine. i shot with my friends everyday for three years and then left town but i’ve gone back through the years. once the needle goes in it never comes out.” -Larry Clark

Shot in 1974 with a Sony Porta-Pak, the crazily careering Stranded in Canton documents a cast of hard-drinking Southerners with the intimacy, ease and instability of a seasoned participants. Whiffs of Southern Gothic are not new to Mr. Eggleston’s work, but here they rise to the surface — fierce, tragic and proud.

Thanks to this morning’s Staf magazine newsletter, I was turned on to the work of UK-based photographer Nick Waplington. Specifically Surf Riot, a limited-run book published by LittleBigMan Books, which collects a remarkable selection of photos that Waplington took of a riot that broke out during the 1986 OP Surf Pro Championships in Huntington Beach, California.

Halloween often looks vastly different depending on the zip code of where you live. In the case of photographer Amy Stein’s study of kids trick-or-treating in Harlem (view project), with neighborhood markets and landmarks as a backdrop, there’s a strange sense of warmth on a holiday known for such an abundance of tiny ghouls.

Scenes from surrendered homes.

If you want to know what economic collapse looks like, Douglas R. Smith’s photographs of foreclosed homes in California’s Central Valley tell the story. In his series Scenes from Surrendered Homes, visual evidence of the recession is depicted in heartbreaking detail.

Lee Jeffries is an accountant who also happens to take harrowing photos. “My involvement with the homeless started after an encounter with a young girl in London,” Jeffries told Impose Magazine back in September of 2010. “She was huddled under a sleeping bag in a doorway in Leicester Square and took offense as I stole a photo from a distance.…