Tag: Rust Belt

In the annals of American journalism, the Cleveland Press was a long-running and influential daily newspaper known for its attention to working class issues. As a result, many of the newspaper’s articles dug deep in the muck of city business—from sanitation strikes and public transit problems, to urban renewal backlash and pollution control.

In a December 1991 National Geographic article titled “Pittsburgh–Stronger Than Steel,” journalist Peter Miller and photographer Nathan Benn examined the city during the final days of its second Renaissance. Readers were given a glimpse of Pittsburgh in the wake of Big Steel’s collapse, and shown what the city had to offer outside of manufacturing.

Pictured above is an abandoned house on Talbot Avenue in Braddock, PA, photographed by Sean Hemmerle. I have a work space in Braddock and usually drive down Talbot Avenue once or twice a week. It’s off the beaten path, close to the bank of the Monongahela River. Though Braddock is a favorite location for photographers snapping shots of urban decay,…

I haven’t read this series on the Clairton Bears yet, but I’m looking forward to it. At a quick glance, it reminds me of Pat Jordan’s “A Football High” piece written for GEO magazine back in 1980 (brief mention of that story here). Jordan’s piece focused on football in Duquesne, Pennsylvania — the real town that the fictional mill town

This is what post-election drama in the Rust Belt looks like:

The American flag is flying upside down and at half staff at a McDonald’s about 45 minutes outside of Pittsburgh, in Follansbee, WV. We’re told it was the owner’s decision, and we’re trying to track him down to find out his reasons. The pic here is obviously getting a

Each day I drive past this hi-riser on my daily commute through Western Pennsylvania’s Monongahela Valley. In three years, it’s never moved, yet somehow it retains a shine — like the owner still regularly washes and waxes it even though he stopped driving it long ago.

“The Murder of the Mon Valley” by the editors over at Insurgent Notes. Found this article while researching some writing projects I’m putting together about the region. It’s written from a pro-union/pro-labor perspective (i.e., blog’s subhead reads: “Journal of Communist Theory and Practice”), and gives a detailed historical look at the rise of steel manufacturing in the Mon Valley,

In Mitt Romney’s estimation, the best way he can play to his strengths is to ONLY talk about the economy and how LOTS of shit’s gone real bad on Obama’s watch. And really, why not. Since politics is about winning elections and has nothing to do with solving problems, Romney’s just following the rules, right?

Anyhow, Elspeth Reeve over at…

It doesn’t bode well for your town when deaths outpace births; when grade schools are half empty but senior care homes and cemeteries are ready to pop. That’s what’s happening in Weirton, West Virginia. With the town’s funeral-to-baptism ratio currently set at 15 to 1, the future looks bleak. Kenneth Johnson, a senior demographer at the Carsey Institute at the…

Last week I discovered Billy Delfs’ portraits of surfers in Cleveland, Ohio. Rust Wire ran a photo essay featuring Delfs’ shots, which drew me in. But with little background given in the essay, I was curious about these surfers, their community, where exactly they catch waves on the shores of Lake Erie, and how long they had been doing it.…

Last year, when Levi’s launched its ‘Go Forth’ advertising campaign, it was greeted with less-than-favorable reactions from around the Internet (see here, here, and here). Critiques ranged from claims the campaign was racist (print ads featured mostly white men and women) and depicted misplaced interpretations of freedom, to it being hopelessly vague in its themes of hard work and youthful…